Cannes Film Festival 2021: ‘Titane’ wins Palme d’Or; Julia Ducournau turns out to be second female director to win top prize

French movie producer Julia Ducournau has become only the second female director to win the Palme d’Or, the Cannes Film Festival’s top prize, for her movie “Titane.”

In a shock second, jury president Spike Lee declared the success in blunder from the get-go in the awards ceremony after a miscommunication. Wheezes rang around the Grand Theater Lumiere before the ceremony gathered itself and reverted to the ordinary running order. The awkward atmosphere didn’t disperse, nonetheless, with the typically talkative Lee discernibly bashful.

“Crude” director Ducournau returned to Cannes with her second movie, her first in rivalry. “Titane” recounts the account of a young lady who endures a fender bender as a child and proceeds to have an exceptional relationship with vehicles in adulthood. It divided pundits with vocal allies and detractors, however the jury of Lee, individual directors Mati Diop, Kleber Mendonça Filho, Jessica Hausner, entertainers Maggie Gyllenhaal, Mélanie Laurent, Tahar Rahim and Song Kang-ho and singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer wanted to award it top distinctions.

The Grand Prix – the celebration’s second prize – was together awarded to Asghar Farhadi’s “A Hero” and Juho Kusomanen’s “Compartment No.6.”

A double cross Oscar champ from Iran, Farhadi’s mind boggling ethical quality play “A Hero” centers on a prisoner whose great deed on day release sets off a chain of fortune and misfortune.

“Compartment No.6” has been compared to a “Finnish ‘Before Sunrise'” for its offbeat meet-adorable set on a train.

“Memoria” by Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul and “Ahed’s Knee” by Israeli Nadav Lapid shared the Jury Prize.

Best director went to Frenchman Leos Carax for his melodic “Annette,” featuring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard as A-list sweethearts in a destined romance, set up with a good soundtrack by clique pop couple Sparks. Best screenplay was awarded to Ryusuke Hamaguchi for “Drive My Car,” the Japanese director’s adaptation of a Haruki Murakami short story.

Best entertainer went to Caleb Landry Jones for “Nitram,” Justin Kurzel’s retelling of the 1996 Port Arthur massacre in Australia, while best actress went to Renate Reinsve for Joachim Trier’s “The Worst Person in the World.”

Camera d’Or for first movie (and award crossing the Official Selection and the wider program’s The Director’s Fortnight and Critics’ Week) went to Antoneta Alamat Kusijanovic for “Murina,” her strained family show set on the Adriatic Coast.

After Cannes was dropped in 2020, the celebration set off to be the deliverer of film by returning large motion pictures to the big screen. Many celebrations have, in the previous a year, gone half and half or virtual (Venice being the striking special case), however this would not accomplish for the Côte d’Azur. There is not a single charm in sight at online screenings, and what is Cannes without fabulousness? Diamonds and couture don’t photo well on Zoom.

Nobody could at any point blame the celebration for thinking excessively little of itself, yet when a program stacked with huge names was uncovered in June, Cannes’ friend in need complex started looking supported.

A thundering pandemic had different ideas. Covid-19 restrictions have made life hard for traveling industry figures and press, many of whom were required to step through exams at regular intervals to get to the Palais des Festivals. (Twitter has been awash with close to as many reviews of salivation samples as of movies in recent weeks.) Some, oh well, didn’t make it – including this essayist. In any case, maybe more significantly for celebration coordinators, Lea Seydoux, who might have been everywhere with no less than four movies in the Official Selection, was kept at home by a positive coronavirus test (she is reportedly asymptomatic).

Tilda Swinton made up for the shortfall, her ethereal presence gracing films by Joanna Hogg, Wes Anderson, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Mark Cousins – as differed a group a directors as one could expect to amass.

Many celebration lights returned to the Croisette, giving talking points yet leaving flat broke. Among them were Jacques Audiard, Bruno Dumont, François Ozon and Nanni Moretti.

Another old hand was Paul Verhoeven, an agitator who’s been walking the tight rope of high trash/high art (depending on how you read his movies) for years now. “Benedetta,” his chronicled nunsploitation film featuring Virginie Efira, wasn’t lacking in controversy.

Indeed, both “Annette” and “Benedetta” added to what exactly was a horny old celebration on many accounts. Different trends this year included apparently every other film being compared to the Safdie siblings’ “Whole Gems,” and the image ification of “The French Dispatch’s” photograph call (who realized Timothée Chalamet, Wes Anderson, Tilda Swinton and Bill Murray were so relatable?).

French movie producer Julia Ducournau has become only the second female director to win the Palme d’Or, the Cannes Film Festival’s top prize, for her movie “Titane.”

In a shock second, jury president Spike Lee declared the success in blunder from the get-go in the awards ceremony after a miscommunication. Wheezes rang around the Grand Theater Lumiere before the ceremony gathered itself and reverted to the ordinary running order. The awkward atmosphere didn’t disperse, nonetheless, with the typically talkative Lee discernibly bashful.

“Crude” director Ducournau returned to Cannes with her second movie, her first in rivalry. “Titane” recounts the account of a young lady who endures a fender bender as a child and proceeds to have an exceptional relationship with vehicles in adulthood. It divided pundits with vocal allies and detractors, however the jury of Lee, individual directors Mati Diop, Kleber Mendonça Filho, Jessica Hausner, entertainers Maggie Gyllenhaal, Mélanie Laurent, Tahar Rahim and Song Kang-ho and singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer wanted to award it top distinctions.

The Grand Prix – the celebration’s second prize – was together awarded to Asghar Farhadi’s “A Hero” and Juho Kusomanen’s “Compartment No.6.”

A double cross Oscar champ from Iran, Farhadi’s mind boggling ethical quality play “A Hero” centers on a prisoner whose great deed on day release sets off a chain of fortune and misfortune.

“Compartment No.6” has been compared to a “Finnish ‘Before Sunrise'” for its offbeat meet-adorable set on a train.

“Memoria” by Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul and “Ahed’s Knee” by Israeli Nadav Lapid shared the Jury Prize.

Best director went to Frenchman Leos Carax for his melodic “Annette,” featuring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard as A-list sweethearts in a destined romance, set up with a good soundtrack by clique pop couple Sparks. Best screenplay was awarded to Ryusuke Hamaguchi for “Drive My Car,” the Japanese director’s adaptation of a Haruki Murakami short story.

Best entertainer went to Caleb Landry Jones for “Nitram,” Justin Kurzel’s retelling of the 1996 Port Arthur massacre in Australia, while best actress went to Renate Reinsve for Joachim Trier’s “The Worst Person in the World.”

Camera d’Or for first movie (and award crossing the Official Selection and the wider program’s The Director’s Fortnight and Critics’ Week) went to Antoneta Alamat Kusijanovic for “Murina,” her strained family show set on the Adriatic Coast.

After Cannes was dropped in 2020, the celebration set off to be the deliverer of film by returning large motion pictures to the big screen. Many celebrations have, in the previous a year, gone half and half or virtual (Venice being the striking special case), however this would not accomplish for the Côte d’Azur. There is not a single charm in sight at online screenings, and what is Cannes without fabulousness? Diamonds and couture don’t photo well on Zoom.

Nobody could at any point blame the celebration for thinking excessively little of itself, yet when a program stacked with huge names was uncovered in June, Cannes’ friend in need complex started looking supported.

A thundering pandemic had different ideas. Covid-19 restrictions have made life hard for traveling industry figures and press, many of whom were required to step through exams at regular intervals to get to the Palais des Festivals. (Twitter has been awash with close to as many reviews of salivation samples as of movies in recent weeks.) Some, oh well, didn’t make it – including this essayist. In any case, maybe more significantly for celebration coordinators, Lea Seydoux, who might have been everywhere with no less than four movies in the Official Selection, was kept at home by a positive coronavirus test (she is reportedly asymptomatic).

Tilda Swinton made up for the shortfall, her ethereal presence gracing films by Joanna Hogg, Wes Anderson, Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Mark Cousins – as differed a group a directors as one could expect to amass.

Many celebration lights returned to the Croisette, giving talking points yet leaving flat broke. Among them were Jacques Audiard, Bruno Dumont, François Ozon and Nanni Moretti.

Another old hand was Paul Verhoeven, an agitator who’s been walking the tight rope of high trash/high art (depending on how you read his movies) for years now. “Benedetta,” his chronicled nunsploitation film featuring Virginie Efira, wasn’t lacking in controversy.

Indeed, both “Annette” and “Benedetta” added to what exactly was a horny old celebration on many accounts. Different trends this year included apparently every other film being compared to the Safdie siblings’ “Whole Gems,” and the image ification of “The French Dispatch’s” photograph call (who realized Timothée Chalamet, Wes Anderson, Tilda Swinton and Bill Murray were so relatable?).

error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

World News Today will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.